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Eighteen-Month-Old Baby: Sleeping And Eating

Posted by Blooms The Chemist on 5 Jun 2020

Eighteen-Month-Old Baby: Sleeping And Eating


Sleep regression is a term that is daunting for any parent to hear. They have experienced this with their baby from just a few months of age. But it continues to come up every so often.

In this article, we look briefly at sleep regression and what to expect with eating at eighteen months. Should you feel concerned about your baby’s sleeping or eating patterns, it is important that you seek the advice of your trusted qualified healthcare professional.

Sleeping

The eighteen-month sleep regression can be quite challenging to overcome. Generally, there are two reasons why it occurs at around this age:

  • Teething – this is when molars start to develop. This can be very painful and can cause issues with sleep.
  • Independence – while you are enjoying the extra help around the house as your child cleans up after themselves, this also means they are determined to do everything themselves. Along with this comes the will for them to be in charge of their every move.

One solution to try for both of these is simply to stick to your routine as your baby may eventually follow suit. As you will experience, this may not feel particularly easy to do.

Eating

You may find that your toddler is more willing to try new foods. You may take advantage of this and introduce them to new flavours. By now, they are also likely to be mirroring the frequency you are eating, so continue to feed them three meals a day and two snacks. You could take the approach of adding one new food type with each meal.

Calcium is crucial at this age because it is the building block for strong bone development and teeth health. The dietary requirement for a child at this age is 700 mg of calcium a day, which can be two to three serves. This can include milk, yoghurt or cheese.

The sleeping and eating habits of your child are changing rapidly. Every night can be a new challenge, and every meal can be a new adventure. Establishing a routine will help you as a parent and is worth pursuing, but expecting change and being flexible is a wise strategy as well.

Written by Chelsea D.
Chelsea is a mum of one and pregnant with another. She writes about pregnancy, parenting, and body positivity.

All articles are provided as general information and are not intended, nor may it be construed, as medical advice or instruction. Information and opinions expressed are believed to be correct and accurate to the best knowledge and judgement of the authors. Readers should consult their appropriately qualified health care professional prior to taking any action or inaction.