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Mar 10, 2020

There’s no doubt about it — getting out of bed used to be the worst part of my day. I thought I’d tried everything from early nights to morning exercise classes to chilled coffee beside my bed.
 

It was the beginning of February and I still hadn’t made it to a morning gym session. Countless cancellations later and I was still waking up as bloody exhausted as when my head hit the pillow. Worse still, my morning sleepiness was creeping into the afternoon and my annual coffee counter was almost at triple figures.
 

I’d heard that successful people wake up at the crack of dawn. I decided to try my best to become a morning person and actually get up at the sound of my alarm. It’s a hard to break a habit, but it’s possible.
 

Ask your morning person pals for advice
Their suggestions weren’t surprising… but selective hearing played a huge part in my desire to actually take on their suggestions.
 

I committed to a morning Pilates class with my housemate. Better still, the cancellation fee was astronomical without a medical certificate and how the heck would I get my hands on one of those at 5.30am? Holding ourselves accountable (to each other and the cop out fee) would work… surely?
 

Yes, actually. We kept to our word and managed three out of five mornings during the week. We work in the same suburb too, so decided to walk in on those morning we’re not at class.
 

The first few starts were chronically difficult but the subsequent endorphin rush was enough for us to want to keep up the routine. An added perk was the coffee and croissant we’d pick up on the way. We were up early and feeling fab. Now I feel bad getting the tram into work.
 

Build an emotional connection with your early start
You’re getting out of bed to exercise, sure. But you’re also getting out of bed to feel better and get more done.
 

When it’s time to get up, remember why you’re trying to become a morning person. It’ll help soften the blow of the pre-dawn wake up calls. Break the intense emotional connection you have with your bed and replace it with an intense emotional connection with the day’s potential.
 

Wake up to natural light, not rattling alarms
My room fronts onto a busy street so the luxury of leaving my curtains open isn’t an option. My curtains are mighty thick so I wake up to a pitch black bedroom, even in the middle of summer.
 

Enough was enough. I decided to invest in a sunrise alarm clock to awaken me with light rather than sounds. Light therapy alarm clocks slowly emit light for thirty minutes before your desired wake up time. They’re designed to give you a sweet, slow wake up — far more pleasant that the startled awakening provided by noisy, rattling alarm clocks.
 

I hoped that would break my morning cranky streak and surprise, surprise — it actually kind of did.
 

Check in on your sleep health
If you wake up feeling sluggish and tired, it might be worth investigating why.
 

Sleep Apnoea affects around 3 million Australians yet 80% of sufferers remain undiagnosed! In the long term, this poses a serious health risk.
 

The upper airway becomes blocked when the walls of the throat come together during sleep. This leads to a halt in breathing and a panic signal from the brain to wake the person up. Each pause in breathing is called an apnoea.
 

Loud gasping snores can be a common indicator you may have sleep apnoea. If you regularly share a bed with someone notorious for night time noises, give their snores a closer listen — many people living with sleep apnoea have no idea!
 

Head into your local Blooms The Chemist
If you’re concerned you or your partner may be suffering from sleep apnoea, speak to a Blooms The Chemist Pharmacist. Your local Blooms The Chemist can test you for sleep apnoea, overnight in the comfort of your own home and offer advice on how to manage your sleep apnoea. The best news is – sleep apnoea testing is half price this March, so don’t sleep on it!
 

For more information on developing healthy habits, including a solid sleep routine, drop into your local Blooms The Chemist.
 
Written by Rebecca O’Malley.

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