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Vaccinations: Preparing, Research, And After Care

Posted by Blooms The Chemist on 18 May 2020

Vaccinations: Preparing, Research, And After Care


Seeing your newborn in discomfort is an experience moms may do anything to avoid. But when a vaccination causes discomfort, it is something that can be accepted due to the increased health benefits. In this article, we explore what vaccinations to expect for your newborn.

Vaccinations help to protect newborns from the potential illnesses they may encounter going about everyday life. Their immune system has not been developed yet, so they need assistance to keep them safe.

How many vaccines might parents expect their newborns to have? What about when they are a year old? Does this continue throughout their toddler years as well?

Speak with your baby’s doctor or pharmacist about the vaccinations your newborn will require. Let’s look at what is generally considered as a baby’s vaccination schedule[1].

  • Birth – Hepatitis B (usually offered in hospital)
  • 1 Month – Hepatitis B
  • 2 Months – Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, polio, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Pneumococcal, Rotavirus[b]
  • 4 Months – Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, polio, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Pneumococcal, Rotavirus[b]
  • 6 Months – Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, polio, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Additional vaccines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (QLD, NT, WA and SA) and medically at-risk children[c]: Pneumococcal
  • 12 Months – Meningococcal ACWY, Measles, mumps, rubella, Pneumococcal. Additional vaccines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (QLD, NT, WA and SA). Hepatitis A.
  • 18 months – Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Measles, mumps, rubella, varicella (chickenpox), Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough). Additional vaccines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (QLD, NT, WA and SA) Hepatitis A.

Potential Side Effects

It is helpful to be aware of some potential side effects your baby may have after a vaccine:

  • Redness at the injection site
  • Low-grade fever
  • General irritability
  • Increased hunger

After Care

Here are some trusted methods to help calm your baby after they have received vaccinations.

  • Swaddle
  • Nursing / Feeding
  • Distractions
  • Any other extra TLC

To protect you and your baby it is important to be aware and receive timely vaccinations. It may be difficult to imagine the discomfort the process will create but the benefits to your child, and their community, are very significant and clearly established and proven through peer-reviewed medical research and evidence.

Written by Chelsea D.
Chelsea is a mum of one and pregnant with another. She writes about pregnancy, parenting, and body positivity.

[1] https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/immunisation/immunisation-throughout-life/national-immunisation-program-schedule

All articles are provided as general information and are not intended, nor may it be construed, as medical advice or instruction. Information and opinions expressed are believed to be correct and accurate to the best knowledge and judgement of the authors. Readers should consult their appropriately qualified health care professional prior to taking any action or inaction.